ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 301-310

Prescription of inhalers among pulmonologists and nonpulmonologists: is there a difference?


1 Department of Chest Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minia, Egypt
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minia, Egypt
3 Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Bani Suef University, Bani Suef, Egypt
4 Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minia, Egypt
5 Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Fayoum University, Fayoum, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ali Omar Abdel Aziz
Chest Department, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Minia, 61519
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ejb.ejb_26_16

Rights and Permissions

Objective The objectives of this study were to evaluate prescription of inhalers and to assess knowledge and practice of doctors who can deal with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, regarding inhalation therapies and inhalation techniques. Patients and methods A prospective, cross-sectional survey was carried out on physicians from different specialties who can deal with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Results The questionnaire was completed by 443 respondents. Ninety percent of nonpulmonologists mentioned that they frequently see and manage patients with chronic pulmonary diseases. Totally, 25 physicians reported that they never prescribe inhaler medications. The most common cause for no or little prescription was that ‘patients refused to use inhalers’ (42.0%). The respondents were pediatricians (37.3%), internists (33.7%), primary-care physicians (16.0%), and pulmonologists (12.9%). About 52% stated that they themselves provided device training for their patients. Pressurized metered dose inhalers were preferred by 64.8% of physicians. Only 21.3% had good general inhaler therapy knowledge (score >2). Pulmonologists scored higher than other specialty groups regarding good knowledge of inhalation therapy (66.7%), whereas pediatricians scored the lowest (8.3%). Conclusion Prescription of inhalers, knowledge among physicians regarding inhalation therapy, and correct use of inhalers varied between pulmonologists and nonpulmonologists, and was generally inadequate. More effort is needed to change the attitude of physicians toward the concept of inhalation therapy.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed140    
    Printed7    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded39    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal